Archive for Leadership

Changing Thoughts

Change is hard.

I know that all of us in the Leadership and HR fields write about it endlessly, offering sometimes facile reminders like “The only constant in life is that everything changes,” or “To improve is to change.” And those clichés—well-worn because they’re true—are certainly worth remembering.

But we know, deep down, that it’s not quite that simple.

We often write about change as it happens to others: our employees, our teammates, our family members and friends. It’s easy, then, to offer simple advice because, after all, it’s happening to someone else. But when it happens to you, then you remember the truth of just what change really is.

Change is hard.

Try to remember the last time a big change occurred in your life. Perhaps it was a relocation from a place you had lived for many years to a place much less familiar. Or maybe it was a job change, and the trepidation that came from walking in that first day, not knowing anyone at all and suddenly realizing that you were now surrounded by relative strangers with whom you were about to spend eight or more hours a day, every day. Or maybe it was a sadder, more personal event, like the occasion when your first-born left for college and you realized that a voice, a pattern of footsteps, which had become part of you had now wrenched free.

If you’re like the rest of us, then it didn’t much matter whether someone offered you a timeless homily, didn’t matter if someone suggested you plan out what you would do next. If you’re like the rest of us then a big change hit you in the gut, sparked a viscerally emotional response. That was what needed to be dealt with before you could move forward—the feelings sparked by a major change in your life.

I sometimes wonder whether we, as consultants, as professionals, as experts, take the few needed moments to recall that when we help our organizations deal with change, there are very real people dealing with those changes, and most of those people are not thinking about denial and bartering, or Bridges’ famous model, or the precise ways in which communications are flowing from one group to the other. What most of them are probably thinking about—and quite justifiably—are What does this mean to me? and Will anyone listen to me? and What comes next?

We’ve all immersed ourselves in the how of helping organizations cope with change. We need, equally, to remember the how of helping people cope with change. In fact the latter, I would argue, is far more important, for it’s the people that create our organizations. It is always crucial—in any “change project”—that we take the time to talk to people, to find out what they are feeling, to let them know that it’s okay, and to help them through it. Only then can organizations effectively manage change.

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Why We Should Invest in Employee Development

As I sit here this morning it is once again snowing outside, and—even though I live in New Hampshire—I’m surprised and just a little bit frustrated by it. It’s been such a hard, hard winter, and with everyone I know anticipating the coming season with a fervor I’ve rarely seen, it feels almost like a step backward, one that’s pushing spring even further away. Still, this latest snowfall rapidly melts, and I know that it’s just another slow step in the move toward the greens and yellows that mark the first forsythia buds, now only just around the corner.

It may not look like it, but change is coming.

Thinking about the slowness of nature’s seasonal shifts reminded me that we, our co-workers, our leaders, and our organizations also change slowly. We invest in them through training and development, through coaching, through workshops and team-building experiences, and yet the next day—when everyone returns to their “real work,” nothing seems all that different. People still seem to talk to each other the same way while they perform the same tasks in support of the same objectives that drive the same strategies.

So if that’s true, why invest at all?

Because change is slow, sometimes too slow even to see.

While the snow falls my placid dog Zoe lies nearby, curled on one of the several beds we’ve scattered around the house for her. (Yes, I know: she’s spoiled!) She’s a wonderful dog, and the day we rescued her was one of our happiest. I’m trying now to picture her as she was when we first got her (as an eight-week old pup, newly weaned), and I find that the image easily leaps to mind. What doesn’t leap to mind, though, is seeing her grow day by day. Oh, I remember what she looked like when she was about six or seven months old, and I certainly know her as an adult, but I can’t recall ever seeing her change.

Yet she did. She does.

The same is true of ourselves and those we work with. Each event, each investment, each opportunity for learning creates a situation in which the tiniest of changes can occur. And while each tiny change may be unnoticeable, over time those changes accrue until, just like with my dog, (or your child, or that oak tree that you never realized was quite so tall) something shifts, leaving a person stronger and bolder and more confident than before.

People change and improve. Cultures change and improve. Leaders change and improve.

So keep providing those opportunities, encouraging people to go through that training and development, that coaching, those workshops and team-building experiences.

The investment is worth it.

P.S. I’d like to offer a shout out to Robin Eichert at PeopleSense Consulting, whose blogs about her own wonderful Grace inspired today’s post.

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3 Ways that Coaching Supports Strong Mutual Relationships

We firmly believe that the key to effective “mutual relationships” is to “map” your organization’s customer/supplier commitments. Once built, however, keeping those mutual relationships alive and thriving takes personal discipline, a willingness to remain open to the needs and concerns of others, and a true desire to remain aligned with the goals the organization.

This is where coaching comes in.

Leadership coaching vastly improves the success of transformational and impactful change—exactly the kind of change organizations undergo when beginning to center on relationships.  How, exactly, does this happen?

  1. Coaching encourages the development of deep listening, the ability to truly hear what others are saying without defensiveness and without judgment.
  2. Coaching provides the means to explore and unlock potential, and to deepen confidence and capability, exactly the kinds of skills needed to develop the kinds of trust inherently part of strong mutual relationships.
  3. Coaching deepens new ways to be curious, to open oneself up to the kinds of questions designed to explore rather than to make a point, to create rather than to block, and to relate rather than to defend.

Coaching supports stronger relationships with customers and colleagues (who are also “customers,” as we know) by renewing energy, increasing awareness both of self and others, and describing new ways of being in relationships. All of this offers a way to influence and to sustain over time the important mutual relationships developed with our approach.

Organizations are complex systems that are challenged with monumental and accelerated change.  Results can be achieved through leaders who value the natural diversity of leadership styles and the talents of the teams they lead.  All leaders can benefit from learning how their own styles impact those they lead and the results desired, and nowhere is this more of a vital component than within the emerging world of newly formed mutual relationships.

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A New View of Working Relationships: Part Three—Knowledge Sharing

Last week we introduced the idea of customer—supplier relationships at work, relationships based on the idea that everyone both gets and gives important things to others.

This idea of customer—supplier relationships is a fundamental foundation for taking a new view of working relationships, one of five such foundations we have identified. We introduce the second one today, and it is this:

We must relearn how to share.

We don’t much share at work, really share. Our knowledge is valuable to us: it protects our job, makes us feel important, and creates respect in others. But for companies to work really well, knowledge sharing is critical. And we’ve forgotten how to do it. Why? Because it’s been trained out of us.

Even before you reached kindergarten, it’s likely that you had some exposure to the “rightness” of sharing. Perhaps you had a sibling or a cousin close in age that you played with frequently. If so, your parents, grandparents, aunts, and uncles probably all told you more than a few times that you needed to “play nice” with someone or to let “your little sister take a turn.” Sharing is what we were taught to do, what we were expected to do and what we needed to do. Sharing, we were told in many different ways, is a cultural norm.

But then we graduated from kindergarten into the mainstream environments of our elementary grades, and slowly the ideas of sharing and independence slip into competition, as if you can’t really do one and also the other. And it’s this dichotomy that continues into our adult lives and into the workplace. But how does it happen?

It begins very early, during the time we transition from a sharing-based play/learn environment to a more learning-centric environment in school. As we move through the grades, each progressive world we are led to relies more on individual measurement, usually in the form of grades. We are tested on what we learn, study, and know for ourselves. And slowly, as we move through our school years, what used to be sharing is given a new name: cheating.

For those of us who go on to college, that training becomes even more intense. Despite the study groups and the joint projects, despite the way students may take notes for each other in order to skip a class or two, there is now an even stronger emphasis on independence, on that individualized grade. Now, in college, you’re not just going to be graded on what you know, you’re also going to be graded on what other people don’t know. It’s called the curve, and it means, simply, this: To score well, to get a good grade, you must be better than the average within your class. Inherently that means that you must know more than other people around you in order to truly succeed.

And so there we all stood at one time or another: on the threshold of our working lives, degree in hand, gladdened (or not) by how we’ve scored throughout twelve or sixteen or twenty classroom-filled years, and ready to move forward into hopefully fulfilling and interesting careers. Eventually we find that door and begin, bringing with us all the training and learning worked into us over the entirety of our educated lives. And one of those things we’ve learned, that is now practically bred into us, is how not to share.

But sharing our knowledge with others (and having them share theirs with us) is a critical component for creating the customer—supplier environment we want and need for our organizations. As leaders we must learn to recognize the importance of encouraging and enabling sharing whenever and wherever we can.

Photo courtesy of: otnaydur / 123RF Stock Photo

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A New View of Working Relationships: Part Two—Customers and Suppliers

In last week’s introduction to this series on Working Relationships, we threw darts at the myth that people at work know exactly what they need and how to get it. This simple dictum—a kind of “conventional wisdom—is simply untrue. People generally don’t know what they need, and so part of what we want to do when improving our working relationships is to surface exactly what we do need—and to understand why.

We begin shedding light on the conventional wisdom by first introducing some ideas about being a customer and being a supplier.

From the moment we get up in the morning we are, in one way or another, a customer. You may have your morning coffee while watching the local news, in which case you are a customer of your local cable company (on whom you depend to provide the signal), the owners of the channel you’re watching, and those who put on the broadcast itself. If you channel-surf from the news to, say, a sports or business station, then you become customers of those services and companies as well. Perhaps you stop to get gas on your way to work, in which case you’re a customer of Shell, perhaps, or Sunoco, and if you then take a toll road to the office, you’re again a customer—this time of your state’s transportation department.

The list is endless, and not just in a metaphorical way. From now until your very last day on earth, you will be a customer: dry cleaning, dentistry, movie theater, super-market, electronic store, plumber, airline, bookstore, hair salon, hockey team, university, emergency road service, doctor, manicurist…. There is not a day—not a single day—in which you can (or should) avoid this role.

Yet we never speak in these terms at work. We talk about having customers—those individuals and organizations to which our company sales products and services—but we don’t often think of ourselves as customers of each other, customers inside the company. We don’t imagine that the engineering department, for example, is a customer of the finance department when, in fact, engineering can’t do a thing—can’t purchase materials or hire staff or maintain equipment—unless the finance department approves the engineering budget.

Being a customer is almost like second nature to most of us; given that we have so many customer experiences—every single day, in fact—it should come as no surprise that it’s pretty easy for most of us. In fact, most of the time we probably don’t think of it directly, we simply expect certain things to be provided to us, and to be provided in ways that are easy, that cause neither difficulty nor confrontation. And most of our customer interactions are like that—we walk into some place (or log on some site) with a set of expectations and most times those expectations are met. So used to adequate (one might almost say “invisible”) service, we acknowledge it only in the most automatic ways—a “thank you” and a smile at most.

But for every time we’re a customer, someone, it’s worth remembering, is acting as a supplier, giving something to us. And it stands to reason that we are also suppliers, often and every day. We’re probably much less aware of it, but we provide things to others constantly, mostly without even realizing it.

At work this supplier role takes on very significant meaning, yet it’s a role we almost never acknowledge. Too often we complete work we’re “supposed to” complete, yet never really understand what it’s for or how it’s used.

If you think about it, there is a fundamental relationship between person-as-customer and person-as-supplier. There must be, or else why would any product, service, or work ever happen?

Next week: Defining the “Customer—Supplier Relationship”

Images Courtesy of: stuartphoto / 123RF Stock Photo
and lightwise / 123RF Stock Photo

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SHRM: Is it Worth it?

As leadership development professionals, we constantly find ourselves inundated with invitations to join various organizations.  Here is just a partial list of some of the ones we regularly run across:

  • The Association for Talent Development (formerly the American Society for Training and Development)
  • International Coach Federation
  • International Association of Coaching
  • College and University Professional Association for Human Resources
  • American Coaching Association
  • National Human Resources Association
  • New England Human Resources Association
  • HR Certification Institute
  • Talent Acquisition and Management Industry Association

And, of course, the granddaddy of them all…

  • SHRM, the Society for Human Resource Management

SHRM, with more than a quarter of a million members worldwide, dwarfs all the others. It is the “go-to” for most HR and leadership professionals; joining is an obvious no-brainer—or so it would seem. But do people actually use SHRM, and is it worth it?

In a word: Yes.

We’re not just talking about the perk that is the annual conference, a well-rehearsed affair with an array of wonderful keynotes (Condi Rice in one of the years we went), numerous topical sessions, decent food, and fantastic networking opportunities. We’re talking about the actual resources they provide, principally through their website, various education offerings, and nearly 600 local chapters. (The jury will be out for a while on their new certification venture, so we’re setting that aside for now.)

And people truly use these resources: according to Alexa, a website ranking tool, the SHRM website is one of the top 25,000 most-visited websites in the entire world. (Lest that number not impress you, keep in mind that there are over 1 billion websites out there right now.) That translates to about 250,000 visitors (and 1.1 million pageviews) per month—pretty impressive for a special-interest site.

So why go there? Well, here is our Top Five List of reasons to join (and use) SHRM:

  1. The Trends—An incredible number of questions in the HR world boil down to the “What’s happening out there?” variety. SHRM offers consistently useful trends to tell you how you compare with others. See, for example, their 2015 Salary Trends Report.
  2. Samples and Templates—Need some guidance on how to write a policy or handbook entry? Interested in sample job descriptions? Just about anything you can imagine is available at SHRM and, unlike what you may find with a random web search, you’ll know it’s been used by others in the HR community.
  3. Research and Metrics—Validating what we do (and turning it into numbers for the rest of the management team) is often a challenging exercise. SHRM provides a ton of current and historical research findings and surveys on just about any HR topic you can think of.
  4. The Legal Angle—It’s amazing how quickly the legal and public policy arenas shift when it comes to HR.  Having a “one-stop shop” for these issues is invaluable, and we’ve used this SHRM area to help numerous clients.
  5. Community—Whether it’s about finding a local group or attending the national conference, no organization provides the level of community for HR professionals the way SHRM does.

All in all, we have to say that the resources SHRM provides are unmatched in the HR world. We visit, and often. Visiting, of course, means joining, and the annual membership fee (which costs about $15 a month) is well, well worth it.

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What are YOU Reading this Summer?

Summer reading lists are something of an American tradition. The New York Times Book Review, for example, just released its fattened summer book edition, a habit that goes back scores of years and now includes such institutions as the Los Angeles Times, Barnes and Noble, the American Library Association, and even TED (of the famous “Talks”). The latter’s list includes such non-standard summer reading material as Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations and Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita.

Renee and I have decided to give you our own summer reading list, one that covers the topics important to all of you, but at the same time meets the criteria expected this time of year: somewhat light and breezy, quickly read, and suitable for the beach (or some similar vacation spot).  So here are five leadership-relevant books (presented in no particular order) that will enlighten and amuse you in various ways…

Quiet, Susan Cain—Both Renee and I are introverts, and so we rapidly embraced this book as a passionate and well-researched case for how and why society tends to undervalue the more quiet among us. Being an introvert, it turns out, is a bit like being left-handed—the world is subtly designed for others and you almost don’t realize it.  Importantly though, introverts not only can become great leaders, but they actually lead in unique ways.

What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, Marshall Goldsmith—There’s a long history of “climbing the ladder” books, popularized most famously by The Peter Principle (which introduced the idea that most people will sooner or later rise to their level of incompetency). In this book Goldsmith argues that you can climb and climb the ladder, but as you climb the skills you need to keep climbing will change. The book introduces the “20 workplace habits you’ll need to break,” if you want to maximize your success. (We particularly like Habit #12, “Making Excuses.”)

The OZ Principle, Robert Connors, Tom Smith and Craig Hickman—And speaking of making excuses, this book’s authors stress that one of the biggest barriers to trust and teamwork in organizations is what they call “the blame game.” Instead, they say, draw a line between being a victim, and being empowered and accountable, then go “above the line” to “see it, own it, solve it, and do it!” Using the Wizard of OZ as an effective metaphor, the book breezes through its key concepts, and will give you new language that reinforces the book’s central ideas. (Also, I love that Glinda the Good Witch represents “above-the-line leadership!”)

The Advantage, Patrick Lencioni—Lencioni may not have pioneered the readable business book, but he’s certainly made it work. He has the five of this and the three of that, uses sexy words like “dysfunction,” and packages it all up into meaningful bites that are both tasty and nutritious. In this book he covers “organizational health” and, true to his motif, give us his “Four Disciplines” model. It may not seem complex, but underneath it all are some pretty heady principles, ones that can actually make a difference.

Archimedes’ Bathtub, David Perkins—This is without a doubt our favorite book on the list. Not strictly a business book per se, Perkins well-written and always interesting book is about breakthrough thinking, and uses as it’s jumping-off point the apocryphal story of how Archimedes figured out the principle of water displacement by soaking himself in a public bath. Filled with stories, games, puzzles—and eye-opening insights, this is a book we go back to again and again. To give you an idea of how much fun this book is, try to figure out the following puzzle, in which you are asked to add one straight line to this inaccurate equation in order to make it a true statement:

(Bonus points: The puzzle actually has THREE answers! Can you find them all? If not, email me at mcharney@charneycc.com and I’ll send you the answers…)

So there you have it: For those of us who just never get away from business books, a few “beach reads” to dive into between dives into the water!

What books are you reading? And how does your summer list compare to ours?

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A Few Thoughts on Coaching Meetings

When we discuss coaching engagements with potential clients, one inevitable question that comes up is “How do you coach and what are your methods?” We encourage this question, and have a thorough response that covers our approach, beginning with the confidentiality and ethical responsibilities outlined by the International Coach Federation, and then continuing on to describe our five-step process: assessment, goal setting, design of an action plan, coaching to plan, and evaluation for continuous improvement.  However, it’s important to remember that the question also has a different meaning, one that clients also care about, and that is “When and how do our meetings occur?”

Many clients not surprisingly prefer face-to-face sessions, and we believe there is an important place for those meetings. (Generally, all of our engagements include some face-to-face time, particularly at the beginning, middle, and closing sessions.)

Face-to-face coaching has obvious benefits. There are advantages, for example, in seeing a person’s body language in order to “read” a mood or attitude. Also, there’s something about just sitting in a room with someone that makes it easier to discuss changes, goals, and commitments.  Face-to-face can also have some downsides, though. Some coaching clients may find it more difficult to answer questions when sitting across from someone and feeling exposed. (This is true even when solid trust between the coach and client has developed.) Similarly, some clients may feel more pressure to respond in the moment (rather than taking some time to reflect) simply because the face-to-face environment often feels more like a “meeting,” and meetings tend to be structured environments where “answers” are expected in the moment.

Face-to-face is only one of several methods we use, however, and it’s worth exploring the others in order to understand why and when different methods might be useful.

Virtual/Visual methods are rapidly becoming a common way to conduct coaching sessions. We routinely work over Skype or Google for one-on-one sessions, sometimes augmented by a shared document that we can co-edit in real time with a client. This environment does a reasonable job of emulating the face-to-face meeting in many respects. While there are some limitations around reading whole body language, along with the occasional delay in response time (you need a good connection for these sessions), the advantage of time savings can often outweigh these minor limitations.

Phone conversations still remain a major tool for coaches, too, particularly once face-to-face sessions have occurred. Those initial sessions give a sense of comfort, friendliness, and trust, all of which can make phone conversations very productive; often these sessions are akin to having a long, comfortable conversation with a friend (albeit a friend with a coaching certification!). Phone conversations also have a subtle but very real advantage over other methods because clients will sometimes say something very important when they feel they have a feeling of removal or anonymity. Phone conversations—with their lack of visual connection—actually provide clients with a thin level of perceived distance, something that can be important for a breakthrough.

Email and texting also have their place, though we use them only for specific, targeted, and brief needs. Because they’re not necessarily in real time (particularly emails), they should only be used for non-urgent requests or follow-up items, and both coaches and clients should recognized that these methods support communications to and from, but do nothing to foster true conversation (which, as we all know, is at the heart of a successful coaching relationship).

The bottom line is that most coaches use a combination of methods, and that clients care what those methods are. So it is very important to ask the question: What kind of method does the client want, and how will it help the engagement to succeed? Given that answer, and given the various advantages of the different methods, the coach can design the right approach for a particular engagement.

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Do You Remember Your Very First Team?

Mrs. Garris was my favorite teacher.

Oh, she could be brutally difficult at times, and more than once, as she stood before the group of twenty-five or so sixth graders to which I belonged, we collectively withered under a glare of practiced anger. But if that were all I remembered she would never have achieved such status.

Hancock Park Elementary School, nestled in a generally middle-class section of Los Angeles, was a conventional and non-descript school back in 1969. We learned our reading, our writing, and our ‘rithmetic just like every other kid.  Teachers had their own personalities—Mr. Guest acted like his name and Mrs. Hawkman had an almost fetishistic interest in perfect penmanship—but for the most part they were largely interchangeable. What you learned in one sixth-grade class you’d learn in another, unless you were lucky enough, as I was, to end up with Mrs. Garris.

I remember things about her class that were different than the others, how, for example, the desks were not always in neat rows but were often grouped together so that kids could interact. This was highly novel at the time, and it must have caused our teacher a bit of consternation now and then, what with the extra chatting and teasing that went on.

I also remember art projects, big ones, ones that seemed silly at the time yet somehow have stuck with me, resonating meaningfully. I remember, for example, studying countries of the world, places that we barely knew existed: Ethiopia, Paraguay, Mongolia, Burma, Western Sahara, Mozambique, Bulgaria. But we didn’t just study them in conventional ways, didn’t just catalog the acres of farmland and industry, or the population caught within each border. Instead we made flags. Great big flags. And we didn’t just draw them, either. We penciled in a huge piece of cardboard, perhaps two feet by three feet, giving it the kind of outline often seen in a paint-by-numbers set: a stripe of green to go here, a star of yellow headed there. And then we took small rips from long sheets of tissue paper, twisted the shred around the eraser-end of a pencil, dipped it in glue, and stuck it where it belonged until, twist by twist, a nation’s flag, almost full-sized, emerged.

I remember thinking then (or think I remember thinking) that this wasn’t really learning. How wrong I was. The reason, you see, was simple: five or six kids, together, working as a team, built each flag, and kept building until the room’s perimeter became a colorful and endless tribute to teamwork, national flag butting national flag around and around.

And the way we made friends, the way we worked together…. I’ve gone back through every class photo I’ve ever been in, looked up and down and across at the faces in them. I remember few, except for those in that one class, Mrs. Garris’s 6th grade at Hancock Park Elementary School: Diane Rice, Karen Gibstein, Jodi Landers, Amy Gelber, Lynn Fleischer, Gary Sloate, David Goldstein, Jeff Bluen. Richard Angelini, Steve Silken, Ruth Rogow, Bari Tisherman, Sherri Spector, Roland Greene. I see the faces and the names are there. These were (and some still are) my friends, and I’m convinced it was because Mrs. Garris insisted that we be part of a team, and then led those teams to success.

Remember that? Remember when it was that much pure fun being part of a team? And when the memories just lasted and lasted?

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The Power of Small Change

“The only thing that never changes is that everything changes.”
–Louis L’Amour

They’re everywhere, so ubiquitous we barely notice them. In every grocery store, dry cleaner, pharmacy, butcher, and ice cream shop. At the Hallmark store. At the Dunkin’ Donuts. And every time you need a penny, you take one. Or if you have an extra penny, you leave one. Right there in that little plastic tray.

Small change.

The pennies just sit there, irrelevant most of the time. But once in a while you need one or two and you notice the tray just there, before you, and that little bit of small change makes things a bit easier, a bit smoother. What if leadership could be like that?

*****

I remember interviewing for a leadership position a number of years ago, an interview filled with questions that required a great deal of thought, questions I couldn’t provide pat answers to. Conducted by Sigal Srur, one of the finest HR executives I’ve ever had the pleasure to work with, the interview was one of the very few that had me honestly nervous.

One of the questions she asked has stuck with me all these years, and it’s one I’ve used myself many times since: “If we hire you, what’s the first change you would make?” On the face of it the question seems ludicrous. Who, after all, starts a new job with the intention of making changes? Isn’t that flatly presumptuous? And yet, if we’re honest with ourselves, we all know that we will make changes. There will be something we see that can be improved, or some way of doing things that we prefer. So Sigal asked a truly insightful question. She knew that if she was hiring someone into a leadership position, change would surely follow. And she wanted to get a sense of my approach.

I gave the obligatory preface, something about how I would spend one solid week observing, conversing and learning, but that after that I would look to quickly make one small change. “It needs to be small and significant,” I remember telling her. “Something that will be remarkably easy to implement, and will make people’s work just a tiny bit easier, but noticeably so.” I gave her a couple of examples from previous jobs. It could be streamlining a process by removing one or two steps, I told her. Or it could be creating a shared drive for project documents. Maybe even something as simple as making sure I say good morning to everyone, every day. Just as long as it was small and significant.

*****

There are tons of books out there on the topic of Change: how to implement it, what to fear about it, when to do it, what to notice when you’re immune to it. What these books often have in common is that they focus on Capital-C Change, change as an event. Our argument is that small-c change is every bit as important, requiring focus to implement and manage. Small changes are going to happen anyway and, like ripples in a pond, will constantly eddy the waters. So why not treat them as a business function in and of themselves?

We’re not alone in our thinking: Patricia Mathieson and Elizabeth Jones, Principals at the British consulting firm Bardwyck, suggest that a “one small change” approach can “find small changes that make significant improvement to the business’s efficiency and effectiveness – allowing it to become more successful more quickly.” Such small changes can build up quickly, yet each one, when treated independently, is far less likely to encounter resistance than any one major program change. Processes, methods, task assignments are all things that change over time, so why not treat them as changes, however small, to manage?

And the beauty of this approach is that it is very low risk. Nearly every leader we know already has the capacity to make a few, small changes. So why not try it out?

And let us know: What small and important change do you plan to make?

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